Party Popes and Naughty Nunneries

Tumblr, but with Chicago footnotes.

Jan 16
mediumaevum:

Heavy cavalry, armed with lances and an assortment of hand weapons, played a significant part in the battles of the Middle Ages. The heavy cavalry consisted of nobles and wealthy knights who could afford the equipment.
Heavy cavalry made the difference between victory and defeat in many key battles. Their charges could break the lines of most infantry formations, making them a valuable asset to all medieval armies, the equivalent of twentieth century tank regiments.
Light cavalry consisted of lighter armed and armoured men, who could have lances, javelins or missile weapons, such as bows or crossbows. Light cavalry were used as scouts, skirmishers or outflankers. Many countries developed their own styles of light cavalry, such as Hungarian mounted archers, Spanish jinetes, Italian and German mounted crossbowmen.
Crusaders tended to favour heavy cavalry mounted on mares while the Saracens favoured light cavalry mounted on stallions.
image: Jan van Eyck (ca. 1390-1441) Altarpiece of the Mystic Lamb, Ghent

mediumaevum:

Heavy cavalry, armed with lances and an assortment of hand weapons, played a significant part in the battles of the Middle Ages. The heavy cavalry consisted of nobles and wealthy knights who could afford the equipment.

Heavy cavalry made the difference between victory and defeat in many key battles. Their charges could break the lines of most infantry formations, making them a valuable asset to all medieval armies, the equivalent of twentieth century tank regiments.

Light cavalry consisted of lighter armed and armoured men, who could have lances, javelins or missile weapons, such as bows or crossbows. Light cavalry were used as scouts, skirmishers or outflankers. Many countries developed their own styles of light cavalry, such as Hungarian mounted archers, Spanish jinetes, Italian and German mounted crossbowmen.

Crusaders tended to favour heavy cavalry mounted on mares while the Saracens favoured light cavalry mounted on stallions.

image: Jan van Eyck (ca. 1390-1441) Altarpiece of the Mystic Lamb, Ghent


Jan 13


Jan 12
theplaceinsidetheblizzard:

Raymond of Toulouse was a straight up babe, new favourite Historical person.

The counts of Toulouse were an entire family of badasses. Raymond’s similarly-named descendent Raymond VI fought a (sadly unsuccesful) war against the Church to try to stop their genocide of the southern French Cathars.

theplaceinsidetheblizzard:

Raymond of Toulouse was a straight up babe, new favourite Historical person.

The counts of Toulouse were an entire family of badasses. Raymond’s similarly-named descendent Raymond VI fought a (sadly unsuccesful) war against the Church to try to stop their genocide of the southern French Cathars.


Jan 10

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Albrecht Dürer (1471-1528), German jack-of-all-trades. His art was unbelievably detailed and beautiful and his works on art theory and maths revolutionised Reformation-era Europe. This is a self-portrait he made when he was 22. Look at his cute hair! Look at his adorable bum fluff goatee! Look at his girly shirt! What more could you want from a hipster painter boyfriend?

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Albrecht Dürer (1471-1528), German jack-of-all-trades. His art was unbelievably detailed and beautiful and his works on art theory and maths revolutionised Reformation-era Europe. This is a self-portrait he made when he was 22. Look at his cute hair! Look at his adorable bum fluff goatee! Look at his girly shirt! What more could you want from a hipster painter boyfriend?

(via frankyfranky99)


Jan 9

kyyhky:

Jewels I found while studying pre Middle Age art history:

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Confused citizen

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Confused angels

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Confused “Why do I have two hands?”

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Confused goat

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Confused Beatles

(via hupla66)


tastefullyoffensive:

No cat is complete without a set of leather battle armor. [kotaku

Buy it on Etsy.

(via bustercyclone)


“In sixteenth-century visual conventions, furthermore, nipples became ‘another paired element of feminine decore, like earrings or false eyelashes,’ cosmetically reddened to contrast more sharply with the artificially whitened face and breast. Even with such changes in erotic signification, however, the beautiful breast throughout the Renaissance and the baroque period was always ‘delicate and minimal.’ Heavy, sagging breasts, Hollander remarks, ‘are shown to be characteristic of ugly old women and witches.’ Images such as the one wrinkled breast with its long nipple which is bared by Albrecht Dürer’s witchlike allegorization of Avarice, an obvious inversion of the visual trope of the single bared breast of the idealized female figure, imply that having heavy, sagging breasts is shameful. […] Thus, though it was much more visible than the reproductive organs, perhaps because it was more visible, the breast is not protected, semiotically or discursively, from the negative effects attaching to the bodily changes of reproduction. The breast, by virtue of its great ‘sympathy’ with the womb, becomes implicated in the mysterious changes and events that made the womb so threatening and unstable an environment. Like the womb, the breast was thought capable of housing bizarre objects: Culpeper cites the authority of Lemnius for breasts containing ‘hair, stones, and worms.’ Gynecological texts narrate stories of women pissing milk and lactating menstrual blood; they elaborate the conditions, such as immoderate desire, which trouble milk. And Joubert even compares milk to semen, ‘the benign excrement, as the substance of semen is that of members.’ Even nipples are subject to distinctly problematic semiosis. According to Joubert, they were popularly thought to be telltale signifiers of socially critical changes in a woman’s sexual status or age. He denies that they are, but Culpeper confidently reports that nipples are ‘blew in them that give suck; black in old women; and in them that have known Venery, it is natural, and red as a Strawberry.’ Discoloration of the nipples, moreover, is a reliable sign of disorder in the womb.” Gail Kern Paster, The Body Embarrassed: Drama and the Disciplines of Shame in Early Modern England (via goneril-and-regan)

(via monetizeyourcat)


Jan 8
mcelroy:

Map of Viking Expansion
From: https://twitter.com/Amazing_Maps who got it from the wikipedia

mcelroy:

Map of Viking Expansion

From: https://twitter.com/Amazing_Maps who got it from the wikipedia

(via beowulfstits-archive)


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